Menashe

An acclaimed father-son dramedy, & the first film shot entirely in Yiddish in 80+ years.

NR, 81 minutes

This charming story of faith and parenthood is set in the heart of Brooklyn’s ultra-orthodox Jewish community, where a kind, hapless grocery store clerk battling to keep custody of his son is given one week by the rabbi to prove his suitability as a father.

After traveling the world for a decade as a documentary filmmaker, director Joshua Weinstein comes back to American soil to tell the story of a man in a custody battle for the son he would do anything to keep. Tucked away in Borough Park in Brooklyn is the small Jewish community where widower Menashe and his son live. A grocery-store clerk with the best intentions but not always the best decisions, Menashe, is an outcast in his own neighborhood, which already lives by its own rules and rituals. As his faith is examined and tested, he must decide what he is willing to compromise and how much he is willing to trust the beliefs he practices. He must prove that he can be the father his son needs. Weinstein’s film provides an impeccably authentic look at New York’s Hasidic community: Menashe is almost the first film in almost 80 years to be shot entirely in Yiddish. As such, it provides a rare and insightful glimpse inside a tight-knit and closed community as one of their own fights for his right to parenthood in modern society, while still striving to uphold the values and traditions he holds dear. (2017, Joshua Z Weinstein, US, 81 min, PG, Yiddish & English with English subs)

Post-show discussion TBA

“Funny, heartbreaking, impeccably observed, and nearly flawless drama.” -Boston Globe
 
“Here is a film dedicated to recognizing our most common obstacles, its quiet storytelling largely accompanied by those feelings at the bottom of anyone’s gut: guilt, shame, defeat. Menashe is a gorgeous ode to everyone’s inner screw-up.” -RogerEbert.com
 
“It works; it takes you somewhere, quietly but evocatively, and it’s affecting without pulling at your heartstrings with both hands.” -Chicago Tribune


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